Friday, February 28, 2014

PVCHR founder Lenin Raghuvanshi at Rex Conclave

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Please read and watch about apathy on Dalit Rights

http://www.asianage.com/columnists/groom-bride-and-prejudice-949
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAITuYENT6o&feature=player_detailpage

Dalit groom beaten for riding buggy

PVCHR Communication

1:40 PM (35 minutes ago)
to covdnhrcjrlawnhrcme
To,
The Chairperson
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi
Dear Sir, 
I want to bring in your kind attention towards the news published in Times of India on dated 24th February, 2014 regarding Dalit groom beaten for riding buggyhttp://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/Dalit-groom-beaten-for-riding-buggy/articleshow/30918489.cms
Therefore it is a kind request please take appropriate action at earliest. 
Thanking You
Sincerely Yours
Lenin Raghuvanshi
Secretary General
NEW DELHI: In a shocking instance of caste discrimination in the capital, a dalit groom was dragged down from his buggy by two upper caste men barely 200 metres from the wedding venue in Maidangarhi, south Delhi, on Thursday night.

The two upper caste men - brothers who were drunk at the time - have been arrested under the SC/ST Act. The two are alleged to have made derogatory remarks against dalits and said that the groom, Sumit Singh, was not qualified to sit on a buggy.

Maidangarhi, close to the plush Sainik Farms locality, is an urban village dominated by the Jat community. "Such an incident has happened here for the first time. Shockingly, the upper caste residents of the village aren't even apologetic," said Radhey Shyam, grandfather of the bride, Shanta.

The procession reached near the community centre, which is hardly used, around 10pm. Sumit got into the buggy from his car to go towards Shanta's house. "Dharmendra and Jitender came out of nowhere and started abusing the groom. They then dragged him to the ground and roughed him up," said Nanak Chand, Shanta's father. "Pehle yahan ke naale saaf karo tabhi tu shaadi karega (first clean the drains and only then can you marry)," is what one of the brothers allegedly said to Sumit.

The girl's family had to not only fight off the aggressors but also pacify Sumit's family, as shortly after this, they refused to allow the marriage. "For them, it was about their honour. Even the thought of them returning is agonizing. My son beseeched with them to stay," said the septuagenarian Shyam.

The girl's family has alleged that despite several calls to Mehrauli police station, the cops remained unavailable and a formal complaint could only be registered after four hours. They further alleged that the PCR van refused to register a complaint saying it is the beat constable's responsibility to inform the police station in such a situation. "The cops dilly-dallied. They even pressured us to compromise," said Roshanlal, bride's uncle and a PWD worker at the Vasant Kunj police station (north). Since he had been working with cops, he knew how to go file a complaint and insisted the cops give the suggestion for a compromise in writing.

A case has now been registered under Schedule Caste and Schedule Tribes Act. "A case has been registered under Section 341/323/34 and both the brothers have been arrested," said a senior cop at the Mehrauli police station.

The wedding was solemnized in the presence of police. Instead of taking the pheras at 12.30am, the couple did it at 3.30am. The dalits staying in about 50 houses are anxious as the area is still tense. Kishan has decided to drop his daughter to a nearby school himself. He fears an attempt to settle scores with the community. "Women are the first to be tortured in such cases. We heard that the Radhey Shyam's family was warned of reprisal."

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Dalit groom beaten for riding buggy

PVCHR Communication

1:40 PM (35 minutes ago)
to covdnhrc, jrlawnhrc, me
To,
The Chairperson
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi
Dear Sir,
I want to bring in your kind attention towards the news published in Times of India on dated 24th February, 2014 regarding Dalit groom beaten for riding buggy http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/Dalit-groom-beaten-for-riding-buggy/articleshow/30918489.cms
Therefore it is a kind request please take appropriate action at earliest.
Thanking You
Sincerely Yours

Lenin Raghuvanshi
Secretary General
NEW DELHI: In a shocking instance of caste discrimination in the capital, a dalit groom was dragged down from his buggy by two upper caste men barely 200 metres from the wedding venue in Maidangarhi, south Delhi, on Thursday night.

The two upper caste men - brothers who were drunk at the time - have been arrested under the SC/ST Act. The two are alleged to have made derogatory remarks against dalits and said that the groom, Sumit Singh, was not qualified to sit on a buggy.

Maidangarhi, close to the plush Sainik Farms locality, is an urban village dominated by the Jat community. "Such an incident has happened here for the first time. Shockingly, the upper caste residents of the village aren't even apologetic," said Radhey Shyam, grandfather of the bride, Shanta.

The procession reached near the community centre, which is hardly used, around 10pm. Sumit got into the buggy from his car to go towards Shanta's house. "Dharmendra and Jitender came out of nowhere and started abusing the groom. They then dragged him to the ground and roughed him up," said Nanak Chand, Shanta's father. "Pehle yahan ke naale saaf karo tabhi tu shaadi karega (first clean the drains and only then can you marry)," is what one of the brothers allegedly said to Sumit.

The girl's family had to not only fight off the aggressors but also pacify Sumit's family, as shortly after this, they refused to allow the marriage. "For them, it was about their honour. Even the thought of them returning is agonizing. My son beseeched with them to stay," said the septuagenarian Shyam.

The girl's family has alleged that despite several calls to Mehrauli police station, the cops remained unavailable and a formal complaint could only be registered after four hours. They further alleged that the PCR van refused to register a complaint saying it is the beat constable's responsibility to inform the police station in such a situation. "The cops dilly-dallied. They even pressured us to compromise," said Roshanlal, bride's uncle and a PWD worker at the Vasant Kunj police station (north). Since he had been working with cops, he knew how to go file a complaint and insisted the cops give the suggestion for a compromise in writing.

A case has now been registered under Schedule Caste and Schedule Tribes Act. "A case has been registered under Section 341/323/34 and both the brothers have been arrested," said a senior cop at the Mehrauli police station.

The wedding was solemnized in the presence of police. Instead of taking the pheras at 12.30am, the couple did it at 3.30am. The dalits staying in about 50 houses are anxious as the area is still tense. Kishan has decided to drop his daughter to a nearby school himself. He fears an attempt to settle scores with the community. "Women are the first to be tortured in such cases. We heard that the Radhey Shyam's family was warned of reprisal."


 

NCPCR intervention on killing of children and others by Paramilitary forces in Chhatisgarh,India

Dr. Lenin Raghuvanshi,CEO and Founder of PVCHR petitioned to National Commission for Protection of Child Rights(NCPCR) on 6 June 2012 and Chhatisgarh Government instituted Judicial inquiry. 

what are you doing for others?

Apolitical associates are more dangerous,because they are using political way of selfishness to promote apolitical way one hand and second hand promote and protect extreme self interest. I am remembering great quote of Martin Luther King.Jr. He Says," Life's most persistent and urgent question is,' what are you doing for others?"

Monday, February 24, 2014

The Dying Lives of Varanasi Weavers:From the camera of Mr.Rohan Juierie

 In spite of the flourishing trade, the weaver of the ‘dream’ sarees lives a nightmarish existence of abject poverty.
 Lohta, a cluster of villages with a significant weaver population is located about 10 kilometers from the city of Varanasi. Many weavers have had to leave the city and move to places like this, as survival in the city was impossible. Things are not better here either.
 Lali Rajbhar, 65, an unemployed weaver, with his family. His wife and daughters earn a meager living by making incense sticks. Many weavers are being forced to give up this centuries old craft and take up other low paying jobs.
 Asim Ali, 15, earns less than a dollar a day as a hired laborer in a loom. Lack of education and alternative employment opportunities force children to continue in their fathers’ trade.
 To reduce cost of production weavers feel compelled to involve their children in various aspects of the work. In the most desperate situations, children can be hired or sold for very little money or against a loan extended to their parents, starting a cycle of bonded labour.
 The eldest in his family, 12 year old Pattu Ansari does not go to school but learns his father’s trade at a loom, earning 80 cents a week.

 Pattu Ansari’s mother Rukhsana, spends hours on end laboring to finish an already woven saree for 30 cents a day, while one of her four children, who is malnourished, entertains himself. The exploitation of women as free or cheap labor subsidizes the entire Banarasi saree industry.

 Rukhsana’s youngest child, Imran died a month after this image was taken. He was four months old and acutely malnourished. 50 % of weaver’s children suffer from malnutrition raising questions about the Government’s Integrated Child Development Services program whose objective is to reduce incidence of mortality, morbidity and malnutrition among 0-6 years children
 Abdul Kalam, 32, incurred a huge debt to pay for the treatment of his severely malnourished two year old son. Though the child’s condition was reported in the news, no aid was forthcoming
 Mohammed Yakub, 35 with his family, sitting on the only piece of furniture they own. His three year old son, Tayammul has cerebral edema and is in extreme pain. He earns 80 cents a day and cannot afford his son’s medical treatment.
 Tausifa Noor, had been suffering from cerebral edema since birth. Though three years old, she couldn't walk yet. She died a few weeks after this image was taken. Her parents earn 80 cents a day and could not afford the treatment, which would have cost USD 5000.
After Naazra Khatoon’s husband, a weaver, died, the family’s condition deteriorated to such an extent that her 14 year old daughter and 3 year old son succumbed to starvation. The government came to her aid only after the deaths of her children created a furor.
 Like others Naseem Akhtar, 24, started weaving since he was a child. Now in his most productive years he is unable to work having contracted tuberculosis, a common ailment amongst the weavers caused due to breathing in fibres and dust from the fabrics they work with. Lohata has 100,000 cases of TB, unusually high even for India with an estimated 2.4 million cases.
 The loom system is partially embedded into the ground and a pit is made for the weaver to keep his legs. The long hours and varying temperature in the pit results in serious damage to the lower part of the body, leading a weaver to remark: “Handlooms today are the graves of living people."


Write up by: Reshma Pritam Singh


I am Rohan Juierie, and I am a Documentary Photographer.  I have a formal education in Film Making.  Photography is self-taught and began on one of my travels.  In 2004, I was 18, I was still in Film school and it was my first time away from home alone.  I carried a camera.  I went with the flow not wanting to have a fixed agenda as such.  The road took me to border villages in Kashmir and Ladakh.  I was glad the camera gave me an opportunity to meet new people since I've always been a shy person.  I simply shot what I encountered and came back home with 50 rolls of film, much more than what I had ever shot.  They were all photographs of people I'd met, with only a few landscape shots.  Though I liked the latter, what moved me most were the images of the people and their lives.  I knew then that I wanted to pursue Documentary Photography.

Over the years, I've realised the importance of documentary work in my life. It allows me to see the less obvious aspects of life and get an insight into the lives of others. It has also taught me to be more accepting and kind; not to take my life and opportunities for granted.

Photography is important to me to establish a sense of belonging with the world. Without the camera, I'm just another pessimist. The camera allows me to view people without my prejudices and judgements. Though their suffering is theirs alone, it is also universal. Thus it became my mission to confront human suffering through beauty, not as an end to all suffering, but an attempt to redeem it.


I do self-assigned projects full-time. I work part-time with NGO's and corporate clients to fuel my documentary projects.


Sunday, February 23, 2014

BENARASI DEATH NET


A report on suicide and malnutrition among weavers in Varanasi was prepared by the People’s Vigilance Committee on Human Rights in collaboration with ActionAid, an international anti-poverty agency. It said that about 175 weavers fell prey to financial hardships since 2002. The Economic Survey (2009-10) estimates that over 50 per cent weavers’ children are malnourished. There is a high prevalence of TB, particularly multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The survey also said that while the human development index of India is steadily improving, weavers and their children in Varanasi continue to die either by committing suicide or succumbing to malnutrition.

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Vice president's Secretariat intervene in Muzaffarnagar Communal Riot after urgent appeal by PVCHR

Vice president's Secretariat intervene in Muzaffarnagar Communal Riot after urgent appeal by PVCHR. please see following links. 

In English:
http://www.pvchr.net/2014/01/urgent-appeal-truth-of-riot-victims-of_12.html 

In Hindi : 
http://www.pvchr.net/2014/01/blog-post_5605.html




Lenin Raghuvanshi with Mr. Sven Wolf in Germany at Remschied

Thursday, February 13, 2014

NHRC report on Human Rights Defenders


It is very useful report for your reading. It is striking – and also thought-provoking - that PVCHR is directly referred to thrice in the section of HRD complaints to NHRC.

Water causing health havoc in 80 villages



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: PVCHR Communication <cfr.pvchr@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, Feb 13, 2014 at 10:55 AM
Subject: Water causing health havoc in 80 villages
To: covdnhrc <covdnhrc@nic.in>, jrlawnhrc <jrlawnhrc@hub.nic.in>
Cc: "Dr. Lenin Raghuvanshi" <lenin@pvchr.asia>



To,
The Chairperson
National Human Rights Commission
New Delhi
Dear Sir,

I want to bring in your kind attention towards the news published in daily English Newspaper Times of India on dated  12 February, 2014  regarding Water causing health havoc in 80 villages http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/allahabad/Water-causing-health-havoc-in-80-villages/articleshow/30283180.cms
Therefore it is a kind request please take appropriate action at earliest.
Thanking You
Sincerely Yours
Lenin Raghuvanshi
Secretary General
PVCHR
SA 4/2 A Daulatpur, Varanasi

Monday, February 10, 2014

The impact of using social media

Post by PVCHR.

Sunday, February 09, 2014

Join us and be the part of satyagraha for neo-dalit for creating broader unity



PVCHR is observing fortnight celebration of Neo-dalit campaign from 10th February, 2014 to 21 March, 2014 intensively through various programs in Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Jharkhand of India. 

• Perspective building & training
• Folk School(http://pvchr.asia/?id=223)
• Meeting
• Human Rights street movement 

During the programme following days will be also observed: 
• 20 February as World Day of Social Justice https://www.un.org/en/events/socialjusticeday/
• 8 March as International Women Day http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Women's_Day
• 10 March as Indian Women Liberation Day http://www.pvchr.net/2013/03/indian-women-liberation-day.html
• 15 March as International Day Against Police Brutality http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Day_Against_Police_Brutality
• 21 March as International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination http://www.un.org/en/events/racialdiscriminationday/

Already on 22 March, 2012 PVCHR organized discussion on neo dalits movement in gender perspective on 22 March, 2012 at 11 am at Paradkar Smriti Bhawan, Maidagin Varanasi, India. 

To know about Satyagraha please visit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyHfDtk9rQ0

Please light the candle to support the Neo-Dalit Movement: broader unity of broken people against Caste system, Communal Fascism and neo-liberal policy. It is in support of justice, secularism, peace, non-violence and prosperity.

Please confirm your esteem presence and send your report and feedback at pvchr.india@gmail.com

Looking forward for your kind participation.

Lenin Raghuvanshi
Founder and CEO

“It is possible for those who are different in all kinds of ways, to cohere as a unified community.”
– Archbishop Desmond Tutu

“I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if it needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

Hatred does not cease by hatred, but only by love; this is the eternal rule.
--The Buddha

"We are what we think. With our thoughts we make our world." 

Saturday, February 08, 2014

Weavers’ Villages in India Suffer TB Epidemic

To,
Chairperson,
National Human Rights Commission(NHRC)
New Delhi.

Sir,

Greetings from Peoples' Vigilance Committee on Human Rights(PVCHR).


Associated Press and Time published about pligt of weaver in Varanasi in general and Lohta in particular.

http://world.time.com/2014/02/07/weavers-villages-in-india-suffer-tb-epidemic/
(LOHATA, India) — This cluster of poor villages, long known for its colorful silk saris, now is known for something else: tuberculosis. Nearly half of Lohata's population has it — some 100,000 people — and the community's weaving tradition is part of the reason it is on the front line of a major Indian health crisis.
The area of Uttar Pradesh state is under unofficial quarantine because of the epidemic. Strangers rarely venture into these villages outside the ancient city of Varanasi. Even rickshaw drivers refuse to enter, turning away the few passengers looking for a lift.
The high rate of TB cases in Lohata is unusual, even for India, where the disease kills about 300,000 people every year. Poverty and malnutrition are factors, but the fact that so many people in Lohata are weavers also is significant, said Dr. J.N. Banavalikar, vice chairman of the TB Association of India, a government agency.
Thousands of sari weavers work all day in cramped rooms, breathing in minute threads that weaken their lungs and make them more susceptible. "They work in poorly ventilated rooms for hours, and that spreads germs very fast," Banavalikar said.
India has made important strides in health in recent years, most recently by launching a successful polio vaccination campaign. But tuberculosis has remained a stubborn problem in India, which has more than a quarter of the world's new TB cases.
Children are especially at risk.
Mumtaz Ali says he has no way to help his 4-year-old grandson, Anwar, who coughs throughout the day, spitting blood with each spasm.
"Doctors say he is malnourished," Ali said. "They say we should give Anwar nutritious food. But the fact is, I cannot even afford two meals a day — forget about giving him milk and eggs. Only Allah can save us."
The average income in Lohata is about 3,000 rupees per month ($48).
In many ways, Lohata's fortunes have fallen with the decline of the sari industry, leaving many already vulnerable families destitute.
Shruti Naghvanshi, who works with Voice of People, a conglomerate of charity groups in Uttar Pradesh, said weavers used to produce about five saris per week. Now, due to changing fashions and a lack of raw materials, weavers are lucky if they make two per week.
Less weaving means more poverty and poorer nutrition, and TB's toll on Lohata appears to be growing. About 12,900 people in the villages died of the disease in 2011, and about 13,700 died in 2012, according to Dr. S.P. Dubey, a health official in Uttar Pradesh who oversees the TB program. Statistics for 2013 are not yet available.
India has the highest incidence of TB in the world, according to the World Health Organization's Global Tuberculosis Report 2013, with as many as 2.4 million cases. India saw the greatest increase in multidrug-resistant TB between 2011 and 2012.
Although the government has launched programs to combat the disease and offer free TB drugs, but there are serious nationwide roadblocks. Quacks with no training often treat TB patients, and pharmacists routinely give out antibiotics without prescriptions.
"These quacks give high-potency antibiotics which initially give them relief but in the long term, these people develop drug resistance," said Dr. Surya Kant Tripathi, head of the Department of Pulmonary Medicines at King George's Medical University in Lucknow, the state capital.
Another factor contributing to TB's growing drug resistance: Many patients, weary of TB drugs' harsh side effects, stop their treatment once they feel better instead of taking the full course.
Critics say the federal government's anti-TB campaign is inadequate. Its centerpiece is a program that pays counselors and private groups to verify patients take their medicine, but counselors get paid only for those who complete the standard six-month course of treatment, so they have an incentive to lie when patients drop out.
Banavalikar, of the TB association, said that in some cases local officials fail to implement federal guidelines on making drugs widely available.
"Despite reprimanding the officials, we are yet to get positive results from them," he said. "The government is doing its best. But we do not have labs to identify TB, particularly the drug-resistant strain. So, we do not know exactly the number of TB patients and how many of them are drug-resistant."
Uttar Pradesh Health Minister Ahmad Hasan said it's the federal government that is failing because it is not providing enough drugs to treat everyone.
"Unless we get medicine," he asked, "how can we control TB?"
Those suffering from the disease also say they need more help.
Farzand Ali says he borrowed 50,000 rupees ($800) from his relatives when the condition of his son, 21-year-old Ghulam, deteriorated rapidly in 2012. He took his son to a specialized TB hospital in the Indian capital, New Delhi.
"After four months' treatment, we came back," Ali said. "We were told my son is infected with deadly strain of multidrug-resistant TB."
Now, Ghulam is being treated in a state-run hospital, but Ali said it is not giving him the more expensive medication he needs.
It costs 10,000 rupees ($160) per month, but Ali earns just a pittance — as a weaver.
"Where will I get this money from?" he asked.

Read more: Weavers' Villages in India Suffer TB Epidemic | TIME.com http://world.time.com/2014/02/07/weavers-villages-in-india-suffer-tb-epidemic/#ixzz2shLCJqLY


Please immediate take action on above mentioned situation.
With warm regards,


Lenin Raghuvanshi   
Founder and CEO
PVCHR

Hatred does not cease by hatred, but only by love; this is the eternal rule.
--The Buddha

"It is possible for those who are different in all kinds of ways, to cohere as a unified community."
– Archbishop Desmond Tutu

"I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for and to achieve. But if it needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die."
Nelson Mandela

"We are what we think. With our thoughts we make our world." - Buddha
This message contains information which may be confidential and privileged. Unless you are the addressee or authorised to receive for the addressee, you may not use, copy or disclose to anyone the message or any information contained in the message. If you have received the message in error, please advise the sender by reply e-mail to pvchr.india@gmail.com and delete the message. Thank you.

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Maulana Abdul Batin Nomani on Integrated approach of technology in education


SDTT-PVCHR initiative on Integrated approach of technology in education: 



Speech of Maulana Abdul Batin Nomani, the mufti of Benares. Please read this:

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

‘প্রভাবদুষ্ট রাজনীতি বাংলাদেশে ন্যায় বিচার প্রাপ্তিতে বড় বাধা’


Our Founder and CEO Lenin Raghuvanshis' interview published in the Manab Zamin (Bengali: মানবজমিন "People's Land") which is a major daily tabloid newspaper in Bangladesh, published from Dhaka in the Bengali language. It is the first and largest circulated Bengali tabloid daily in the world, with monthly website hits of 3,270,000. 590,000 visitors from 179 countries from all over the planet visit the web site every month, making it one of most visited Bengali-language online publications worldwide. The newspaper is also the only Bangladeshi newspaper to boast credentials and affiliations with FIFA, UEFA, and the English Premier League. It has also partnered with Sony Pictures and Warner Bros. in publicity for Hollywood productions, including Batman Begins, Superman Returns and Casino Royale.



About newspaper:

‘প্রভাবদুষ্ট রাজনীতি বাংলাদেশে ন্যায় বিচার প্রাপ্তিতে বড় বাধা’

জাকারিয়া পলাশ | ৩ ফেব্রুয়ারি ২০১৪, সোমবার, ২:৩২ | মতামত: ১ টি
ভারতীয় মানবাধিকার কর্মী লেনিন রঘুভানসি বলেছেন, বিচারবহির্ভুত হত্যাকান্ড, রাষ্ট্রীয় বাহিনীর নিষ্ঠুর নির্যাতন, সংখ্যলঘুদের উপর হামলা, দুর্নীতি- সব মাপকাঠিতেই ভারত ও বাংলাদেশের মানবাধিকার পরিস্থিতি প্রায় একইরকম। অর্থ ও পেশীশক্তির প্রভাবদুষ্ট রাজনীতি প্রান্তিক মানুষের ন্যায়বিচার প্রাপ্তির বড় বাধা হয়ে দাঁড়িয়েছে। শিক্ষাবঞ্চিত, দরিদ্র, নি¤œবর্ণের যেসব মানুষ সহায়হীন তাদের জন্য অভিশাপ হয়ে দাঁড়াচ্ছে এই অবস্থা। নৃশংস হামলা ও চাঁদাবাজি, কথিত ক্রসফায়ার, ক্ষমতাবানদের বিরুদ্ধে মামলা বা অভিযোগ গ্রহণে অস্বীকার, মিথ্যা অভিযোগে গ্রেপ্তার, বেআইনি রিমান্ড এবং পুলিশি হেফাজতে মৃত্যু এখন নৈমিত্তিক ঘটনা এই দুই দেশে। বিচারবহির্ভূত হত্যা বন্ধে সরকার ও গণমাধ্যমের পক্ষ থেকে ক্রসফায়ারের পক্ষে প্রচারণা বন্ধ জরুরি বলেই মত দেন তিনি। সাউথ এশিয়ান নেটওয়ার্ক এগেইনস্ট টর্চার এন্ড ইমপিউনিটির (শান্তি) কো-অর্ডিনেটর লেনিন রঘুভানসি। ই-মেইলে পাঠানো প্রশ্নের জবাবে মানবজমিন অনলাইনকে তিনি বলেন, ভারতের উভয় প্রান্তে নিরীহ মানুষের মৃত্যু হচ্ছে। সীমান্ত এলাকায় ভারতীয় আধাসামরিক বাহিনীর মনোভাব হচ্ছে ‘বড়’ ভাইয়ের মতো। গণমাধ্যমের তথ্য অনুসারে নিরাপত্তা বাহিনীর সদস্যদেরকে খুব কমই দায়ী করা হয়েছে এমন সাজানো হত্যাকান্ডের পর। গণমাধ্যমের স্বাধীনতা প্রসঙ্গে তিনি বলেন, নামে মাত্র গণমাধ্যমের স্বাধীনতা আছে। কিন্ত প্রেস এখন বণিকদের করায়ত্বে থাকায় তা কাজে আসছে না। উড়িষ্যাসহ বিভিন্ন স্থানে অধিকাংশ খবরের কাগজ রাজনৈতিক দলের প্রতিনিধিত্ব করছে। সীমান্ত হত্যা খুবই গুরুত্বপূর্ণ বিষয় হয়ে দাঁড়িয়েছে। উত্তর প্রদেশের মানবাধিকার সংগঠন পিভিসিএইচআর-এর প্রতিষ্ঠাতা ও প্রধান নির্বাহী লেনিন আরও বলেন, বিচার না হয়ে অপরাধীদের দায়মুক্তি পেয়ে যাওয়ায় সাধারণ মানুষের মনে আইন মেনে চলার প্রতি অনিহা সৃষ্টি করছে। আইনের শাসনের বিচ্যুতি মানবাধিকার কর্মীদের কাজকে করে দিয়েছে কঠিন। মানবাধিকার রক্ষায় সক্রিয় নারী কর্মীরা শুধুমাত্র লৈঙ্গিক কারণে বাড়তি ঝুঁকির মধ্যে রয়েছেন। নারী মানবাধিকার কর্মীদের নির্যাতন ও হয়রানির ঘটনা এখনও মানবাধিকার লঙ্ঘন হিসাবে বিশেষায়িতই হয়নি। তারা তাদের পুরুষ সহকর্মীদের কাছ থেকেও কার্যকর সহযোগিতা থেকে বঞ্চিত হচ্ছেন বলে তিনি উল্লেখ করেন।